Days of Heaven (1979, Terrence Malick; Cinematographers: Nestor Almendros, Haskell Wexler)
This Days of Heaven shot is a wonderful use of color and negative space.  Two main objects occupy the frame: the farmhouse and the modern biplane, which, as if out of a dream, swoops down from the sky and settles into everyone’s lives.  Technology and frivolity are the focus of this segment of the film as a pair of visitors bring costumes, puppets, and even a Charlie Chaplin film to distract and amaze the house’s cohabitants.  It’s brief respite from the cruelty of nature, mother, and human, and for a while it seems as if everyone could live together in this house peacefully, forgetting about the terrestrial and its unconditionally brutal demands.

Days of Heaven (1979, Terrence Malick; Cinematographers: Nestor Almendros, Haskell Wexler)

This Days of Heaven shot is a wonderful use of color and negative space.  Two main objects occupy the frame: the farmhouse and the modern biplane, which, as if out of a dream, swoops down from the sky and settles into everyone’s lives.  Technology and frivolity are the focus of this segment of the film as a pair of visitors bring costumes, puppets, and even a Charlie Chaplin film to distract and amaze the house’s cohabitants.  It’s brief respite from the cruelty of nature, mother, and human, and for a while it seems as if everyone could live together in this house peacefully, forgetting about the terrestrial and its unconditionally brutal demands.

2 notes

  1. theillstills posted this